Category Archives: Programs

Summer Social!

Our next meeting will be a social meeting, perfect for bringing a portable project and catching up with your fellow Guild Members!

We’ll meet on the third Thursday on the lawn outside the Senior Center in Redwood City where we usually meet.  If there are issues with air quality we’ll move inside. Bring a portable project and an outdoor chair, and your own food and drink, no refreshments will be served.

At the time of this posting, masks are not required indoors, but if we move indoors, we recommend that you wear one.

Date: Thursday, July 21, 2022
Time: 6PM Pacific
Location: Redwood City Veterans Memorial Senior Center
1455 Madison Avenue
Redwood City, CA 94061-1549

May 26 – CNCH Wrap Up / Show & Tell

Our May Guild meeting will be on the 4th Thursday this month (May 26) due to CNCH. This will also be our first in person meeting this year!

Our guest speakers will be you, our guild members! This will be an extended show and tell. Share what you’ve learned at CNCH, both in and out of the workshops. What is grabbing your interest right now? What are you exploring? We want to hear from you! So bring your projects and stories.

While masks are no longer required in indoor spaces, we do encourage using a mask, asking that you do what is comfortable and safe.

April 21 – Marilyn Romatka

Uzbek Ikat: The Personal Saga of an Exceptional Cloth

Marilyn’s textile journey started with pack animals, llamas to be precise, and rapidly moved from there to spinning, then knitting, then weaving, and then to exploring textiles around the world. In the process, she became passionate about learning a wide variety of textile folk arts. She shares her knowledge through demonstrations at museums, projects with children, and through her book “Creative Crafts of the World.”

Our program this month will be a blend of travelogue and technique. We will explore the traditional Ikat techniques of the Uzbek people in Central Asia. In Marilyn’s own words:

Experience the exotic in your own home town; travel to Central Asia in this multi-media presentation. We have all seen Uzbek Ikat on the runway in New York and London, now travel back to Uzbekistan with Marilyn to watch the process of its production. Each thread manipulated, dyed, and woven into exquisite cloth – truly hand-crafted. Plus, a show-and-tell after the presentation.

Marilyn’s presentation will be followed by a question and answer session, and then by our own guild Show and Tell.

March 17 – Miriam Omura

Our March speaker will be Miriam Omura. Miriam is a textile and visual artist who works with many types of media, including weaving, fabric and photography. She will be speaking to us about her unique warp painting technique. Miriam will first describe the technique she uses and then take us on a journey through some of her pieces and their stories.

Memories result is a translation that acts as an interpretation of an event. As an immigrant, I have found my place through trying to understanding culture and place. This began with my past work, which dealt with personal identity through memory and family history connected to England and Sri Lanka. In recent years, that focus has shifted to exploring broader overlapping concerns that intersect with identity and social issues. Building on ideas of perspective and perception developed in my past work, my current imagery attempts to understand and ask questions about who and what makes up society around us. In looking for a way to comment on issues that will invite conversation and further investigation on the part of tthe viewer.

The memories we recall can be intentionally or accidentally distorted, changing without our realization. When memories are retrieved, they fuse with other memories to produce an unclear view that sits between truth and fiction. As a memory is recalled, it becomes layered and reshaped by the chemical process of retrieval in the brain. It is my hope to visually capture these ideas within my work, showing the intangible aspects of memory.

Also of interest is her story about moving from being working in museums to becoming an entrepreneur. 

Artist Website

February 17 – Andean Textile Arts

Textile Traditions of the Peruvian Highlands

Peruvian woman dressed in traditional clothing, sitting on the ground, weaving a scaffold piece with a backstrap loomDuring this hour long hosted video presentation, weavers, dyers, knitters, and spinners of the Peruvian highlands who are cooperative members of the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco (CTTC) are featured. The focus is on the preservation and revitalization of their traditional textile arts—including some techniques dating back to the Incas. These include the Andean way of spinning, dyeing, and knitting, as well as the tools to create belts, bands, textiles, woven edges, and skirt borders. Through the video clips and images, the weaving of doubleweave, ikat, tapestry, and discontinuous and supplementary warps are also highlighted.

This video program is narrated by ATA board member and well-known doubleweave author and teacher, Jennifer Moore. In addition to the video presentation, one or two ATA board members will be present on the scheduled Zoom call to field questions in real time at the end of the video. The total program, with the Q&A, is about one hour.

“Textile Traditions of the Peruvian Highlands” is an inspiring virtual visit to the weavers, spinners, knitters, and dyers of the Peruvian Highlands. It is an opportunity to “travel” to this part of the world and be exposed to the area’s unique traditional textiles and cultures.

January 20 – Mayumi Fujio: Natural Dye, Mushroom Dye and Botanical Printing

Mayumi Fujio has always enjoyed working with her hands to blend imagination into her creations. She loves learning traditional craft techniques – Ikebana, silver jewelry, ceramic art, sewing, dying with mushroom, and knitting. Fiber art is a natural progression and botanical printing is bringing together all of the handicraft skills she developed in the past. Her inspiration comes from art, nature, and simply looking at flowers and plants wherever she goes. After learning the technique of botanical printing, Mayumi has been experimenting with the combination of traditional and newly discovered natural dye techniques. As a modern craft, botanical printing is a constant cycle of learning and experimentation, yet it can never be fully controlled. Just like nature.

Her latest series is a combination of mushroom dye and botanical prints.All the plants she uses are ethically harvested from the Bay Area and her art pieces are sold at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, Seattle Asian Art Museum, and other prestigious art fairs around the Bay Area.

Her website is: https://www.mayumix.com

November 18 – Catharine Ellis

Series of handwoven panels dyed in a range of color from yellow on the left to scarlet on the right, using shibori technique.
The Intersection of Weaving and Dyeing

Although weaving and dyeing are two distinct textile skills, the combination and integration of these processes one can vastly expand a design vocabulary. The result is a more complex and personalized finished textile. Applications for these weave/dye combinations include ikat, woven shibori, and cross dyeing. The primary focus of this talk will be the use of natural dyes, but synthetic dye use is also applicable. Catharine will share her thought process, her dye choices, and talk about the evolution of her woven and dyed work over more than 40 years.

photo of Catharine EllisCatharine Ellis has been a weaver and a dyer for over 40 years. After three decades of teaching the Fiber Program at Haywood Community College in NC she is now dedicated to studio work, focusing on natural dye processes. She also does specialized, selected teaching, in the U.S. and internationally. Recent projects include teaching natural dyeing in Guatemalan through Mayan Hands.

Catharine is the originator of the woven shibori process and author of the instructional book, Woven Shibori (Interweave Press, 2005) and The Weaver’s Studio – Woven Shibori: Revised and Updated (Interweave Press, 2016). Her most recent publication is The Art and Science of Natural Dyes: Principles, Experiments, and Results (2019). All three books are available to borrow from the guild library.

Catharine’s Website
Catharine’s Blog

October 21 – Deborah Corsini

Deborah Corsini Fire Season Wedge Weave TapestryBold graphic line, zig zag stripes and scalloped selvedges are striking characteristics of wedge weave. Instead of weaving perpendicular to the warp, as is usual for tapestry, wedge weave is an eccentric weaving technique where the wefts are woven at an angle to the warp. In wedge weave the patterned design and weaving structure are inextricably connected.

In her presentation Deborah will discuss the brief time when some Navajo weavers experimented with this “rouge” technique and the influence that their work and this style has had on her and other contemporary weavers. She will show images of Navajo wedge weaves and of her own work in wedge weave and that of other contemporary weavers experimenting with eccentric weft techniques.

Deborah Corsini has a lifelong passionate interest in the study of textiles, textile cultures and the making of textile art. A weaver for over 50 years she is a studio artist exhibiting her works nationally. She holds a Masters in Textiles from San Francisco State University and a B.F.A. from California College of Arts (and Crafts.) She has taught weaving and tapestry at City College of San Francisco and workshops in various textile techniques such as tablet weaving and wedge weave at the Richmond Art Center, the Mendocino Art Center, and the Conference of Northern CA Handweavers. She will be offering a workshop in wedge weave in the upcoming CNCH in 2022. Deborah has been lucky to have had two textile related careers. As the former Creative Director of P & B Textiles and a textile designer she honed her sense of color and design and appreciation of patterns both printed and woven. As the former curator of the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles she gained a deeper respect and appreciation for the history of quilts and the ever-evolving contemporary fiber art scene. She is active in the community and continues her studio practice in Pacifica, CA.

September 16 – Ginger Summit

Ginger Summit landscape in felt. A bubbling stream with trees showing autumn foliage of reds and oranges.
“Walk by A Mountain Stream”. Ginger Summit. HGA: Small Expressions 2021

Ginger Summit has been a creator for all of her life, from weaving, creating spirit figures and musical instruments out of gourds (author of over 7 books on gourds), and creating community (Los Altos City Council and Mayor). Her latest venture is creating art with felt.

Ginger will share with us her journey through felt, how she developed her own process for
working with both wet and dry felt, and some of her favorite pieces, from self healing to commercial pieces. One of her recent pieces, “Walk by A Mountain Stream” was accepted into Handweavers Guild of America (HGA) Small Expressions 2021, an annual juried exhibit featuring contemporary small-scale works. The exhibit showcases works created using fiber techniques in any media, not to exceed 15 inches (38 cm) in any direction, including mounting, framing, or display devices.